Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Sunday, September 15, 2019

attenborough

Among the UN's 17 goals - if 8 billion humans are to thrive as tech changes every human possibility- 14 life below water , 15 life on earth provide the most direct opportunity to model how nature runs the globe's systems, and so the disaster man will cause if our use of tech to go global fails to value natures system maps. Staring with the moon race decade of the 1960s, we have known that the 3 generations living 1960-2030 would be mediating change on a scale that either competes or cooperates with nature- more at 5G 4G 3G 2G 1G 0G. -see also WRJ Gordon Moore

The UN Geneva event pictured took place about a week after Hurricane Dorian had destroyed lives on many thousands on the bahamas. In the UN language about 50 of 200 nations are SIDS (Small Island Nations) -while small on land they face huge ocean estates- if we destroy their fish, their coral, heat up their waters their future is bleak. At the beginning of the week the president of St Lucia clarified how global financiers after 9/11 made things worse for sids- because a few had money laundered , a move had been made to exclude many sids from the electronic world of finance. He also explained how the elite global economists eg IMF had misvalued sids- when you require them to grow their economy but provide no funding for infrastructure upgrades caused by the rest of the worlds warming- you design a global economy aimed at destroying peoples of sids.
BLUE PLANET
While all these financial arguments have not moved the policy of the G7 nations much in last 20 years, it turns out that the nature broadcasting of David Attenborpugh has. Since the beginning of UK tv Attenborough has told the stories of the natural world. In his recent Blue planet (2) series, a billion viewers including a quarter from china on mobiles saw the stories of fish being killed off by plastic waste and the death of coral. The reduce plastic challenge appears to be uniting the peoples of the world faster than even trump can deny. Thank you bbc;  thank you David Attenborough- may the UN fanlly represent the peoples not just the top powers of nations- that at least is my understanding of what the circular economy will need to map- whats yours? chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

2019 UNGA Guide.  All of the above was in part a rehearsal for UNGA next week in New York- the first annual event under Guterres leadership themed around sustainability goals in general and climate action urgency in particular -UNGA

Latest Press Materials


additional further references
extinction of nations/peoples
3 days ago - Most recently, Saint Lucia's Prime Minister, Allen Chastanet, told the United Nations Trade Forum (September 9-13) that SIDS need urgent help ...


Wednesday, August 14, 2019

bloomberg professors - headline examples

More than 90 percent of the world’s data has been created in the last two years alone, and each day we add 2.5 quintillion bytes more. “We’ve reached a point where we can’t continue storing and analyzing data as we’ve done before. It’s time for a different approach,” said Alexander Szalay, founding director of the Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science at Johns Hopkins, who was appointed as an internally-selected Bloomberg  Distinguished Professor in 2015.
==========
Yuille is a mathematician and computer scientist studying the biology of vision. His research has been focused on the development of computational models for vision, development of mathematical models to explain cognition, artificial intelligence and neural networks in which he is now a world reference.
He is developing mathematical models of vision and cognition that allow us to build computers that, when given images or videos, can reconstruct the 3D structure of a scene. These models also serve as computational models of biological vision which can be tested by behavioral, invasive, and non-invasive techniques.
His work reaches across the computer vision, vision science, and neuroscience communities at Johns Hopkins, particularly in the schools of Arts and Sciences and Engineering.
=========
Daeyeol Lee started out his higher education, in Seoul, by studying economics. Some 20 years later, we was known as one of the world’s leading neuroscientists. To bridge those two points, Lee found ways to blend principles of both disciplines — and others — to investigate the brain’s ability to make decisions.
Lee is known to many as a forefather of a niche field that’s blossomed in the past 15 years called “neuroeconomics,” which integrates not only the two disciplines it’s named for but also tools from artificial intelligence, psychology, and other areas.
After 12 years at Yale University, Lee joined Johns Hopkins University as a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. He works primarily within the Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, and teaches neuroscience courses at the School of Medicine and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

==============
Filipe Campante Developed democracies have formal systems of checks and balances to constrain officials—think of Congress or the courts in the U.S., Campante says. In developing countries, nonestablished democracies, or autocracies, leaders are kept in check by cultural norms, the media, or people protesting in the streets.
But lately, Campante says, when it comes to traditional thinking about how leaders get away with abuses of power, the lines are increasingly blurry.
“I think that these formal checks and balances aren’t as strong as we thought, even in developed democracies,” Campante says. “I think that’s a big lesson from the last couple of years. Not just in the U.S., but very much so in the U.S.”


bloomberg professors include

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yann%C3%ADs_G._Kevrekidis now at john hopikins from princeton - maths &

https://research.jhu.edu/bloomberg-distinguished-professorships/

examples

Vesla Weaver

Racial Politics & Criminal Justice

Departments of Political Science and Sociology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

Outside of the Lexington Market in Baltimore recently, there stood a portal—a gold-painted shipping container, equipped inside with a video screen and microphone. From there, visitors could connect live with residents of Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Mexico City, and Chicago.
The goal of this project was to start conversations about a common undercurrent these cities share: unrest related to police violence. Political scientist Vesla Weaver, a Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor who joined Johns Hopkins University in 2017, intends to use the transcripts of these conversations as one dimension of a new book, The Faces of American Democracy.
The study is the first of its kind to examine systematically the ways low-income black and Latino citizens in the U.S. experience and respond to not only policing and incarceration but various other layers of government, from welfare agencies and housing authorities to schools. Weaver, a leading scholar on racial politics and criminal justice issues in America, initiated the research as part of a Carnegie Fellowship, in response to findings in Ferguson, Missouri after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown.
“We cannot understand modern inequality or begin to move past the harms of incarceration and surveillance without understanding that punitive action is threaded through a multiplicity of activities and agencies in poor communities,” Weaver says of the central questions her book explores.
This project expands upon a body of trailblazing research from Weaver since the start of her career, mining the root causes of inequality and mass incarceration of today’s America.
Weaver is perhaps best known as a leader in the movement to push the social sciences to understand punishment as a crucial site of governance in the U.S. as well as a forceful mechanism of racial inequity. With her research, she has informed one of the central questions facing policymakers today: how to grapple with the consequences of nearly four decades of state-enforced discipline for citizens and communities.
In the early years of her graduate studies at Harvard, Weaver bucked against the common thinking that punishment was not a core concern for political science, successfully arguing that incarceration and surveillance influenced America’s post-war institutions in ways that critically altered the racial politics and inequality of later decades.
“I began to construct a political story for why incarceration rates rose in the U.S. when they did, and that this was not a coincidence,” she says, pointing to the 1960s civil rights movements as the breeding ground for policies “that were purportedly about crime, but underneath that responding to racial changes and student unrest that people were uncomfortable with.”
These topics became the basis for her dissertation Frontlash: Civil Rights, the Carceral State, and the Transformation of American Politics, and a related article for The Studies in American Political Development.
Later, as a professor at Yale, Weaver embarked on the first large-scale empirical study of how these seismic shifts in incarceration and policing shaped the political and civic realities of the communities most affected. Her 2014 book, Arresting Citizenship, developed the idea that criminal justice reforms created a state she calls “custodial citizenship”: an ever-growing demographic of Americans who equate government with control and who become less likely to take part in the political process as a result.
The study, which won the Dennis Judd Best Book in Urban Politics Award, is known for nudging the topic of mass incarceration to the forefront of political science debates, and has served as a reference source for organizations like the Prison Policy Institute and the National Research Council.
As Weaver completes The Faces of American Democracy, she is also working on another book, funded by the Russell Sage Foundation, investigating the growth of economic inequality among blacks and Latinos. Despite longstanding racial group solidarity, this new inequality is causing unfamiliar political rifts over issues like housing, crime, and school policy.
Weaver, who grew up in northern Virginia, studied government as an undergraduate at the University of Virginia—where she later joined the faculty in 2007. In the intervening years, she earned her doctorate in Government and Social Policy at Harvard, where she also worked on the university’s Civil Rights Project.
In 2012, Weaver moved on to Yale, ultimately becoming a tenured associate professor in African American Studies and Political Science. In her time there she served on the Executive Session on Community Corrections with the National Institute of Justice and in 2015 founded The Center for the Study of Inequality.
Joining Johns Hopkins along with her husband, philosopher Christopher Lebron, Weaver says the setting of Baltimore is one “where the kind of research I do—on policing, on racial inequality—can really matter for the city.”

x
x
x