.future 8 billion peoples want to value now2020 top alumni group Fazle Abed- search your top WRJ if not found rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk
explore the scenario at www.futureoflife.org that 2020s tech will exponentially multiply one of two opposite consuences- life thrives everywhere, life self-destructs - search for most humanl deep triads of ai labs eg mit-stanford-estonia
who are top job creating economists by practice - health -refugee sports green hong kong..where are top tour guides around billionaire 1 2 around poverty,,, we the peoples ...
If many people are meeting each other for the first time- including a new class at school - we recommend spending the first 3 minutes: ask people to stand up in groups of three- each person spends 60 seconds on the greatest life changing moment in her life to date and what she did differently because of it. Q&A- 1) why's this smart way spending 3 minutes introducing people? 2) how to action debrief everyone? 3) what other tools exist for innovating simultaneous communications among masses of people? 4) Does our species future generation depend on experiencing such culturally simple and trustworthy ways to spend time communicating? Lets consider 4 firstALUMNI OF WORLDCLASSBRANDS: In 1980 we started a True Media debate at The Economist "Year of Brand" on why human sustainability would depend on intangibles valuation and globalisation designing greatest brand leaders aligned to goals of sustaining generations -evidence had been collected with MIT's first database software of society's needs in 50 nations and thousands of markets
as our 2025 Report (first translated 1984) showed the transition from pure knowledge www to commerce would be crucial- all the dismal errors that had been made with mass media tv might have one last chance of correction-we invite you to check out how well did the world's biggest new market makers eg bezos and ma understand this tipping point - twitter version of 2025 report related ref-download 10 minute audio invitation to make 2020s most loving decade ever from family foundation Norman Macrae- The Economist's Unacknowledged Giant you can select contents for hosting debates on entrepreneurial revolution, youth friendships across borders or download the whole of the 2025 report here
Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

bloomberg professors include

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yann%C3%ADs_G._Kevrekidis now at john hopikins from princeton - maths &

https://research.jhu.edu/bloomberg-distinguished-professorships/

examples

Vesla Weaver

Racial Politics & Criminal Justice

Departments of Political Science and Sociology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

Outside of the Lexington Market in Baltimore recently, there stood a portal—a gold-painted shipping container, equipped inside with a video screen and microphone. From there, visitors could connect live with residents of Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Mexico City, and Chicago.
The goal of this project was to start conversations about a common undercurrent these cities share: unrest related to police violence. Political scientist Vesla Weaver, a Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor who joined Johns Hopkins University in 2017, intends to use the transcripts of these conversations as one dimension of a new book, The Faces of American Democracy.
The study is the first of its kind to examine systematically the ways low-income black and Latino citizens in the U.S. experience and respond to not only policing and incarceration but various other layers of government, from welfare agencies and housing authorities to schools. Weaver, a leading scholar on racial politics and criminal justice issues in America, initiated the research as part of a Carnegie Fellowship, in response to findings in Ferguson, Missouri after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown.
“We cannot understand modern inequality or begin to move past the harms of incarceration and surveillance without understanding that punitive action is threaded through a multiplicity of activities and agencies in poor communities,” Weaver says of the central questions her book explores.
This project expands upon a body of trailblazing research from Weaver since the start of her career, mining the root causes of inequality and mass incarceration of today’s America.
Weaver is perhaps best known as a leader in the movement to push the social sciences to understand punishment as a crucial site of governance in the U.S. as well as a forceful mechanism of racial inequity. With her research, she has informed one of the central questions facing policymakers today: how to grapple with the consequences of nearly four decades of state-enforced discipline for citizens and communities.
In the early years of her graduate studies at Harvard, Weaver bucked against the common thinking that punishment was not a core concern for political science, successfully arguing that incarceration and surveillance influenced America’s post-war institutions in ways that critically altered the racial politics and inequality of later decades.
“I began to construct a political story for why incarceration rates rose in the U.S. when they did, and that this was not a coincidence,” she says, pointing to the 1960s civil rights movements as the breeding ground for policies “that were purportedly about crime, but underneath that responding to racial changes and student unrest that people were uncomfortable with.”
These topics became the basis for her dissertation Frontlash: Civil Rights, the Carceral State, and the Transformation of American Politics, and a related article for The Studies in American Political Development.
Later, as a professor at Yale, Weaver embarked on the first large-scale empirical study of how these seismic shifts in incarceration and policing shaped the political and civic realities of the communities most affected. Her 2014 book, Arresting Citizenship, developed the idea that criminal justice reforms created a state she calls “custodial citizenship”: an ever-growing demographic of Americans who equate government with control and who become less likely to take part in the political process as a result.
The study, which won the Dennis Judd Best Book in Urban Politics Award, is known for nudging the topic of mass incarceration to the forefront of political science debates, and has served as a reference source for organizations like the Prison Policy Institute and the National Research Council.
As Weaver completes The Faces of American Democracy, she is also working on another book, funded by the Russell Sage Foundation, investigating the growth of economic inequality among blacks and Latinos. Despite longstanding racial group solidarity, this new inequality is causing unfamiliar political rifts over issues like housing, crime, and school policy.
Weaver, who grew up in northern Virginia, studied government as an undergraduate at the University of Virginia—where she later joined the faculty in 2007. In the intervening years, she earned her doctorate in Government and Social Policy at Harvard, where she also worked on the university’s Civil Rights Project.
In 2012, Weaver moved on to Yale, ultimately becoming a tenured associate professor in African American Studies and Political Science. In her time there she served on the Executive Session on Community Corrections with the National Institute of Justice and in 2015 founded The Center for the Study of Inequality.
Joining Johns Hopkins along with her husband, philosopher Christopher Lebron, Weaver says the setting of Baltimore is one “where the kind of research I do—on policing, on racial inequality—can really matter for the city.”

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