Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

bloomberg professors - headline examples

More than 90 percent of the world’s data has been created in the last two years alone, and each day we add 2.5 quintillion bytes more. “We’ve reached a point where we can’t continue storing and analyzing data as we’ve done before. It’s time for a different approach,” said Alexander Szalay, founding director of the Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science at Johns Hopkins, who was appointed as an internally-selected Bloomberg  Distinguished Professor in 2015.
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Yuille is a mathematician and computer scientist studying the biology of vision. His research has been focused on the development of computational models for vision, development of mathematical models to explain cognition, artificial intelligence and neural networks in which he is now a world reference.
He is developing mathematical models of vision and cognition that allow us to build computers that, when given images or videos, can reconstruct the 3D structure of a scene. These models also serve as computational models of biological vision which can be tested by behavioral, invasive, and non-invasive techniques.
His work reaches across the computer vision, vision science, and neuroscience communities at Johns Hopkins, particularly in the schools of Arts and Sciences and Engineering.
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Daeyeol Lee started out his higher education, in Seoul, by studying economics. Some 20 years later, we was known as one of the world’s leading neuroscientists. To bridge those two points, Lee found ways to blend principles of both disciplines — and others — to investigate the brain’s ability to make decisions.
Lee is known to many as a forefather of a niche field that’s blossomed in the past 15 years called “neuroeconomics,” which integrates not only the two disciplines it’s named for but also tools from artificial intelligence, psychology, and other areas.
After 12 years at Yale University, Lee joined Johns Hopkins University as a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. He works primarily within the Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, and teaches neuroscience courses at the School of Medicine and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

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Filipe Campante Developed democracies have formal systems of checks and balances to constrain officials—think of Congress or the courts in the U.S., Campante says. In developing countries, nonestablished democracies, or autocracies, leaders are kept in check by cultural norms, the media, or people protesting in the streets.
But lately, Campante says, when it comes to traditional thinking about how leaders get away with abuses of power, the lines are increasingly blurry.
“I think that these formal checks and balances aren’t as strong as we thought, even in developed democracies,” Campante says. “I think that’s a big lesson from the last couple of years. Not just in the U.S., but very much so in the U.S.”


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