.*
9/8/18 paul oyer: fei-fei li : lei zhang
1/1/21 we have entered the most exciting decade to be alive- by 2030 we will likely know whether humans & tech wizards can save futureoflife- tech surveys indicate odds of accomplishing this greatest human mission would be lot less without spirit of a chinese american lady at stanford-...
bonus challenge for those on road to glasgow cop2 nov2021: future 8 billion peoples want to value from 2021 rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

GAMES of world record jobs involve
*pack of cards: world record jobs creators eg fei-fe li ; fazle abed ...
*six future histories before 2021 starts the decade of empowering youth to be the first sustainable generation.

problem 99% of what people value connecting or doing to each other
has changed (and accelerated in last three quarters of a century- while laws, culture and nature's diversity and health are rooted in real-world foundations that took mother earth 1945 years to build with -and that's only using the christian calendar

1995 started our most recent quater of a century with 2 people in Seattle determined to change distribution of consumers' markets - the ideas of how of bezos and jack ma on what this would involve were completely different except that they changed the purpose of being online from education knowledge to buying & selling things -
nb consuming up things is typically a zero-sum game or less if done unsustainable- whereas life-shaping knowhow multiplies value in use
from 1970 to 1995 knowhow needed to end subsistence poverty of over a billion asian villagers was networked person to person by women with no access to electricity grids- their number 1 wrjc involved partnerships linked by fazle abed - borlaug's crop science was one of the big 5 action learnings -its person to person application saved a billion people from starvation; the first 185 years of the machie age started up bl glasgow university's smith an watt in 1760 had brought humans to the 2 world wars; when people from nearly 200 nations founded the united nations at san francisco opera house 1945 chances of species survival looked poor- miraculous;y one mathematician changed that before he died 12 years later- john von neumann's legacy was both the moon race and twin artificial intel labs - one facing pacific ocean out of stanford; the other facing the atlantic out of mit boston .. who are top job creating economists by practice - health -refugee sports green hong kong..where are top tour guides around billionaire 1 2 around poverty,,, we the peoples ...

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

bloomberg professors - headline examples

More than 90 percent of the world’s data has been created in the last two years alone, and each day we add 2.5 quintillion bytes more. “We’ve reached a point where we can’t continue storing and analyzing data as we’ve done before. It’s time for a different approach,” said Alexander Szalay, founding director of the Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science at Johns Hopkins, who was appointed as an internally-selected Bloomberg  Distinguished Professor in 2015.
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Yuille is a mathematician and computer scientist studying the biology of vision. His research has been focused on the development of computational models for vision, development of mathematical models to explain cognition, artificial intelligence and neural networks in which he is now a world reference.
He is developing mathematical models of vision and cognition that allow us to build computers that, when given images or videos, can reconstruct the 3D structure of a scene. These models also serve as computational models of biological vision which can be tested by behavioral, invasive, and non-invasive techniques.
His work reaches across the computer vision, vision science, and neuroscience communities at Johns Hopkins, particularly in the schools of Arts and Sciences and Engineering.
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Daeyeol Lee started out his higher education, in Seoul, by studying economics. Some 20 years later, we was known as one of the world’s leading neuroscientists. To bridge those two points, Lee found ways to blend principles of both disciplines — and others — to investigate the brain’s ability to make decisions.
Lee is known to many as a forefather of a niche field that’s blossomed in the past 15 years called “neuroeconomics,” which integrates not only the two disciplines it’s named for but also tools from artificial intelligence, psychology, and other areas.
After 12 years at Yale University, Lee joined Johns Hopkins University as a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. He works primarily within the Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, and teaches neuroscience courses at the School of Medicine and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

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Filipe Campante Developed democracies have formal systems of checks and balances to constrain officials—think of Congress or the courts in the U.S., Campante says. In developing countries, nonestablished democracies, or autocracies, leaders are kept in check by cultural norms, the media, or people protesting in the streets.
But lately, Campante says, when it comes to traditional thinking about how leaders get away with abuses of power, the lines are increasingly blurry.
“I think that these formal checks and balances aren’t as strong as we thought, even in developed democracies,” Campante says. “I think that’s a big lesson from the last couple of years. Not just in the U.S., but very much so in the U.S.”


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