Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

#BR6 Craig Barrett

Craig Barrett (chief executive)

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Craig Barrett
Craig Barrett by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Barrett in June 2018
OccupationFormer Chairman and CEO of Intel Corporation
Craig R. Barrett is an American business executive who served as the chairman of the board of Intel Corporation until May 2009. He became CEO of Intel in 1998, a position he held for seven years. After retiring from Intel, Barrett joined the faculty at Thunderbird School of Global Management in Glendale, Arizona.

Career[edit]

Barrett served as the president of Intel starting in 1997 and its chief executive officer from 1998 to 2005. He successfully led the corporation through some of its worst times, including the burst of the dot-com bubble and a severe recession.
He was appointed as a member of the Hong Kong Chief Executive's Council of International Advisers in the years of 1998–2005.[1] He joined the board of trustees of the Society for Science & the Public in 2010. In 2010, he also became the co-chair of the Skolkovo innovation center in Russia.[2]
He serves as president and chairman of BASIS School Inc., a charter school group as well as chair of the board of directors for the National Forest Foundation, the nonprofit partner to the U.S. Forest Service.

Education[edit]

Barrett attended Stanford University from 1957 to 1964, and received a Ph.D. in Materials Science. During his time at Stanford he joined the Kappa Sigma fraternity. After graduation, he joined the Stanford University Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and remained there until 1974. Barrett was NATO Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Physical Laboratory in the United Kingdom from 1964 to 1965.[citation needed]
Craig and his wife Barbara gave a $10 million endowment to Arizona State University in 2000. In recognition of their donation, Arizona State renamed their honors program Barrett, The Honors College.[3]

Awards and publications[edit]

In 1969, Barrett received the Robert Lansing Hardy Award of the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, and remains a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is the author of over forty technical papers dealing with the influence of microstructure on the properties of materials, and co-authored a textbook on materials science, The Principles of Engineering Materials, along with UCLA professor Alan S. Tetelman (founder of Exponent, Inc.) and Stanford professor William D. Nix, published by Prentice-Hall in 1973, which remains in use today.[4]
On January 31, 2006, Barrett and his wife were awarded the Woodrow Wilson Award for Corporate Citizenship by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
On June 28, 2009, he was announced the 2009 Laureate of the Global Award of the President of the Republic of Armenia for Outstanding Contribution to Humanity through IT.[5]

Employment at Intel Corporation[edit]

Barrett was employed by Intel Corporation in 1974 as a manager. He was promoted to vice president of the corporation in 1984, to senior vice president in 1987, and executive vice president in 1990. Barrett was elected to Intel's board of directors in 1992 and was named the company's chief operating officer in 1993. He became Intel's fourth president in May 1997, and chief executive officer in 1998. He became chairman of the board in May 2005, when he was succeeded as CEO by Paul Otellini. In January 2009, he announced that he would be stepping down as chairman and member of the board at the annual stockholders' meeting in May 2009.

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