Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Monday, December 8, 2008

br6 tim berners lee

this draft nov 2016 - please mail isabella@unacknowledgedgiant.com any helpful comments
 TOP 10 World Record Job Creators

WRJC Tim Berners Lee

People ask if TB invented the www and is its most connected networker- why isn’t he a billionaire? I think the answer is that ever since 1989 invention of the www he has been MR OPEN (SESAME) : the engineer keeping it open for all 7 billion people to have as near free access as possible. This is a huge job creating stimulus even if its diffuse nature make it less easy to attribute specific job creation inventions to TB: than our other top 10 World Record Job Creators. We’ll demonstrate his jobs creativity mainly by cataloguing players in the ecosystem of MIT and around Boston that thrive because of TBL.

Some people like to call the worldwide web the start of revolution beyond the industrial and non-collaborative age. Designers (since 1972) of The Economist’s curriculum of Entrepreneurial Revolution for investigative journalists and educators of the sustainability potential of the net generation prefer to use the following legend (but please note outside of China this is not the most common terminology)

THE 4 INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONS
Industrial Revolution 1 concluded with world war 2

Evolution of Industrial Revolution 2 began with the computers von Neumann innovated during world war 2- he described these as an obscene interest (1940s code for something of huge social import but necessarily secretive while being key to winning the war)  We see the worldwide web as being the system of systems fusion of the transformation between IR2 and IR3 which accelerated from around 1994 as first text mobile phones emerged, Within little more than a decade, half of the world’s poorest as well as riches people became interconnected. By 1994 the West Coast USA was about a decade ahead of the eastern hemisphere in developing all the software and experiments of  both the webs learning and commercial potential. At the same time the eastern hemisphere had stayed ahead in the high quality manufacturing needed for mass consumer goods of hi-tech. Famously 1994 was when  Jack Ma first saw the www and spent  the rest of time exploring its job creating potential for his Chinese (Hong Kong Taiwan and Mainland) compatriots, and then in sustainable trades with worldwide youth and in developing the greatest learning generation (during 2 hectic months of the China G20 Hangzhou Consensus and the United Nations start of the year that was due to bridge the disunited states of Obama and Trump)

Industrial Revolution 4 comes around 2008 with three things in one:
  • Launch of phones that have full telecomputing capacity
  • Collapse  of trust in western financial and health systems and introduction of bitcoin/blockchain technology – second only to the internet (www) as a communications platform
  • Conviction by everyone in china from policy makers to biggest business leaders to all the people that virtual (and learning economy) will be even  more valuable to the future of work than industrial manufacturing and teamwork between people confined to work out of one office or classroom
 






























upsate from wired
We here at WIRED believe deeply that information should flow freely and fairly across the Internet. We also don’t like censorship, and we don’t like bots disrupting democracy. So, in the past weeks, we’ve written extensively about the debate at the FCC over net neutrality. Today, we write with both sorrow and anger, because in a 3-2 vote, the Commission stripped away those neutrality protections. But we’re not defeated. As Klint Finley explains in his piece, there’s much that can still be done to help the Internet remain the force for innovation that it has been. For starters, the lawyers are about to come on stage. And even if net neutrality can’t be saved in the courts, perhaps it can be saved in Congress, ideally through bipartisan collaboration. We’re not stepping away from the fight, and we’ve got lots of thoughts on how our readers can stay involved too.
Nicholas Thompson * Editor-in-Chief, WIRED
AFTER THE VOTE

The FCC Just Killed Net Neutrality. Now What?

BY KLINT FINLEY
Groups plan to contest the FCC decision's to repeal net neutrality rules.
NET NEUTRALITY

FCC’s Dissenting Voices Defended Net Neutrality To the End

BY KLINT FINLEY
The FCC has voted to roll back net neutrality rules. Read the statements of dissent from the two Democratic commissioners for a better understanding of just how much damage that can do.
FACEBOOK LIVE

Watch: Nick Thompson Answers Readers' Questions on the Net Neutrality Repeal

Earlier today on Facebook, hundreds of readers turned to WIRED to find out this all means. Watch to see those questions answered.
NET NEUTRALITY

The WIRED Guide to Net Neutrality

BY BRIAN BARRETT
After the FCC's historic vote on net neutrality, a look at what's at stake.








































search eg ted videos by don tapscot - he calls blockchain the last chance of getting anything sustainable done by the worldwide web which disgusting platforms like facebook turned into an appendix of the tv advertising industry

blockchain as potentially 100% transparent ledger system takes out one superpowerful middle man from both media and currency or any exchange that depends on some big middleman

here are some examples but it is still a war between first uses in any context being used for good or for a new kind of speculator (bitcoin)

amusingly the very lack of media democracy some people accuse china of is ensuring that the best uses of blockchain for sustaining youth are coming from there wherever it mediates worldwide solutions linking local productivity - big data small ' markets where small enterprises thrive by being better and building local capacity instead of the industrial age descent into big gets bigger

ultimately are politicians superb public servant leaders or what father in 1984 those who gain from macroeconomist being masters of disgraceful political chicanery- same question about economists is clarified in last chapter of keynes general theory on money

chris

“2017 will be a pivotal year for blockchain tech. Many of the startups in the space will either begin generating revenue – via providing products the market demands/values – or vaporize due to running out of cash. In other words, 2017 should be the year where there is more implementation of products utilizing blockchain tech, and less talk about blockchain tech being the magical pixie dust that can just be sprinkled atop everything. Of course, from a customers viewpoint, this will not be obvious as blockchain tech should dominantly be invisible – even as its features and functionality improve peoples’/business’ lives. I personally am familiar with a number of large-scale blockchain tech use cases that are launching soon/2017. This implementation stage, which 2017 should represent, is a crucial step in the larger adoption of blockchain tech, as it will allow skeptics to see the functionality, rather than just hear of its promise.”
–  George Howard, Associate Professor Brown University, Berklee College of Music and Founder of George Howard Strategic


The Blockchain a New Web 3.0?

The blockchain gives internet users the ability to create value and authenticate digital information. What new business applications will result?
  • Smart contracts

    Distributed ledgers enable the coding of simple contracts that will execute when specified conditions are met. Ethereum is an open source blockchain project that was built specifically to realize this possibility. Still in its early stages, Ethereum has the potential to leverage the usefulness of blockchains on a truly world-changing scale.
    At the technology’s current level of development, smart contracts can be programmed to perform simple functions. For instance, a derivative could be paid out when a financial instrument meets certain benchmark, with the use of blockchain technology and Bitcoin enabling the payout to be automated.
  • The sharing economy

    With companies like Uber and AirBnB flourishing, the sharing economy is already a proven success. Currently, however, users who want to hail a ride-sharing service have to rely on an intermediary like Uber. By enabling peer-to-peer payments, the blockchain opens the door to direct interaction between parties — a truly decentralized sharing economy results.
    An early example, OpenBazaar uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer eBay. Download the app onto your computing device and you can transact with OpenBazzar vendors without paying transaction fees. The “no rules” ethos of the protocol means that personal reputation will be even more important to business interactions than it currently is on eBay.
  • Crowdfunding

    Crowdfunding initiatives like Kickstarter and Gofundme are doing the advance work for the emerging peer-to-peer economy. The popularity of these sites suggests people want to have a direct say in product development. Blockchains take this interest to the next level, potentially creating crowd-sourced venture capital funds.
    In 2016, one such experiment, the Ethereum-based DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization), raised an astonishing $200 million USD in just over two months. Participants purchased “DAO tokens” allowing them to vote on smart contract venture capital investments (voting power was proportionate to the number of DAO they were holding). A subsequent hack of project funds proved that the project was launched without proper due diligence, with disastrous consequences.  Regardless, the DAO experiment suggests the blockchain has the potential to usher in “a new paradigm of economic cooperation.”
  • Governance

    By making the results fully transparent and publicly accessible, distributed database technology could bring full transparency to elections or any other kind of poll taking. Ethereum-based smart contracts help to automate the process.
    The app, Boardroom, enables organizational decision-making to happen on the blockchain. In practice this means company governance becomes fully transparent and verifiable when managing digital assets, equity or information.
  • Supply chain auditing

    Consumers increasingly want to know that the ethical claims companies make about their products are real. Distributed ledgers provide an easy way to certify that the backstories of the things we buy are genuine. Transparency comes with blockchain-based timestamping of a date and location — on ethical diamonds, for instance — that corresponds to a product number.
    The UK-based Provenance offers supply chain auditing for a range of consumer goods. Making use of the Ethereum blockchain, a Provenance pilot project ensures that fish sold in Sushi restaurants in Japan has been sustainably harvested by its suppliers in Indonesia.
  • File storage

    Decentralizing file storage on the internet brings clear benefits. Distributing data throughout the network protects files from getting hacked or lost.
    Inter Planetary File System (IPFS) makes it easy to conceptualize how a distributed web might operate. Similar to the way a bittorrent moves data around the internet, IPFS gets rid of the need for centralized client-server relationships (i.e., the current web). An internet made up of completely decentralized websites has the potential to speed up file transfer and streaming times. Such an improvement is not only convenient. It’s a necessary upgrade to the web’s currently overloaded content-delivery systems.
  • Prediction markets

    The crowdsourcing of predictions on event probability is proven to have a high degree of accuracy. Averaging opinions cancels out the unexamined biases that distort judgment. Prediction markets that pay out according to event outcomes are already active. Blockchains are a “wisdom of the crowd” technology that will no doubt find other applications in the years to come.
    Still in Beta, the prediction market application Augur makes share offerings on the outcome of real world events. Participants can earn money by buying into the correct prediction. The more shares purchased in the correct outcome, the higher the payout will be. With a small commitment of funds (less than a dollar), anyone can ask a question, create a market based on a predicted outcome, and collect half of all transaction fees the market generates.
  • Protection of intellectual property

    As is well known, digital information can be infinitely reproduced — and distributed widely thanks to the internet. This has given web users globally a goldmine of free content. However, copyright holders have not been so lucky, losing control over their intellectual property and suffering financially as a consequence. Smart contracts can protect copyright and automate the sale of creative works online, eliminating the risk of file copying and redistribution.
    Mycelia uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer music distribution system. Founded by the UK singer-songwriter Imogen Heap, Mycelia enables musicians to sell songs directly to audiences, as well as licence samples to producers and divvy up royalties to songwriters and musicians — all of these functions being automated by smart contracts. The capacity of blockchains to issue payments in fractional cryptocurrency amounts (micropayments) suggests this use case for the blockchain has a strong chance of success.
  • Internet of Things (IoT)

    What is the IoT? The network-controlled management of certain types of electronic devices — for instance, the monitoring of air temperature in a storage facility. Smart contracts make the automation of remote systems management possible. A combination of software, sensors, and the network facilitates an exchange of data between objects and mechanisms. The result increases system efficiency and improves cost monitoring.
    The biggest players in manufacturing, tech and telecommunications are all vying for IoT dominance. Think Samsung, IBM and AT&T. A natural extension of existing infrastructure controlled by incumbents, IoT applications will run the gamut from predictive maintenance of mechanical parts to data analytics, and mass-scale automated systems management.
  • Neighbourhood Microgrids

    Blockchain technology enables the buying and selling of the renewable energy generated by neighbourhood microgrids. When solar panels make excess energy, Ethereum-based smart contracts automatically redistribute it. Similar types of smart contract automation will have many other applications as the IoT becomes a reality.
    Located in Brooklyn, Consensys is one of the foremost companies globally that is developing a range of applications for Ethereum. One project they are partnering on is Transactive Grid, working with the distributed energy outfit, LO3. A prototype project currently up and running uses Ethereum smart contracts to automate the monitoring and redistribution of microgrid energy. This so-called “intelligent grid” is an early example of IoT functionality.
  • Identity management

    There is a definite need for better identity management on the web. The ability to verify your identity is the lynchpin of financial transactions that happen online. However, remedies for the security risks that come with web commerce are imperfect at best. Distributed ledgers offer enhanced methods for proving who you are, along with the possibility to digitize personal documents. Having a secure identity will also be important for online interactions — for instance, in the sharing economy. A good reputation, after all, is the most important condition for conducting transactions online.
    Developing digital identity standards is proving to be a highly complex process. Technical challenges aside, a universal online identity solution requires cooperation between private entities and government. Add to that the need to navigate legal systems in different countries and the problem becomes exponentially difficult. E Commerce on the internet currently relies on the SSL certificate (the little green lock) for secure transactions on the web. Netki is a startup that aspires to create a SSL standard for the blockchain. Having recently announced a $3.5 million seed round, Netki expects a product launch in early 2017.
  • AML and KYC

    Anti-money laundering (AML) and know your customer (KYC) practices have a strong potential for being adapted to the blockchain. Currently, financial institutions must perform a labour intensive multi-step process for each new customer. KYC costs could be reduced through cross-institution client verification, and at the same time increase monitoring and analysis effectiveness.
    startup Polycoin has an AML/KYC solution that involves analysing transactions. Those transactions identified as being suspicious are forwarded on to compliance officers. Another startup Tradle is developing an application called Trust in Motion (TiM). Characterized as an “Instagram for KYC”, TiM allows customers to take a snapshot of key documents (passport, utility bill, etc.). Once verified by the bank, this data is cryptographically stored on the blockchain.
  • Data management

    Today, in exchange for their personal data people can use social media platforms like Facebook for free. In future, users will have the ability to manage and sell the data their online activity generates. Because it can be easily distributed in small fractional amounts, Bitcoin — or something like it — will most likely be the currency that gets used for this type of transaction.
    The MIT project Enigma understands that user privacy is the key precondition for creating of a personal data marketplace. Enigma uses cryptographic techniques to allow individual data sets to be split between nodes, and at the same time run bulk computations over the data group as a whole. Fragmenting the data also makes Enigma scalable (unlike those blockchain solutions where data gets replicated on every node). A Beta launch is promised within the next six months.
  • Land title registration

    As Publicly-accessible ledgers, blockchains can make all kinds of record-keeping more efficient. Property titles are a case in point. They tend to be susceptible to fraud, as well as costly and labour intensive to administer.
    A number of countries are undertaking blockchain-based land registry projects. Honduras was the first government to announce such an initiative in 2015, although the current status of that project is unclear. This year, the Republic of Georgia cemented a deal with the Bitfury Group to develop a blockchain system for property titles. Reportedly, Hernando de Soto, the high profile economist and property rights advocate, will be advising on the project. Most recently, Sweden announced it was experimenting with a blockchain application for property titles.
  • Stock trading

    The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.
    Numerous stock and commodities exchanges are prototyping blockchain applications for the services they offer, including the ASX (Australian Securities Exchange), the Deutsche Börse (Frankfurt’s stock exchange) and the JPX (Japan Exchange Group). Most high profile because the acknowledged first mover in the area, is the Nasdaq’s Linq, a platform for private market trading (typically between pre-IPO startups and investors). A partnership with the blockchain tech company Chain, Linq announced the completion of it its first share trade in 2015. More recently, Nasdaq announced the development of a trial blockchain project for proxy voting on the Estonian Stock Market.





Judd Bagley: What is Blockchain “2016 was the year in which blockchain theory achieved general acceptance, but remained in theory, with the big players lingering around the hoop waiting to see who would take the first shot. As the year comes to an end, blockchain technology is tantalizingly close to turning the corner and entering the realm of small-scale commercializability. Overall, 2017 is going to be the year of the very well-considered and well-funded proof of concept, with a few projects achieving revenue positive status. Venture investment is going to continue to be substantial but less than we saw in 2016 and 2015. I’d predict one or two exits by acquisition.” 



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    Alibaba founder Jack Ma unveils ambitious plan

    Mission: 100 million new jobs
    By Dana McCauley

    He already runs the world's biggest online shopping company, but Alibaba founder Jack Ma is not satisfied.
    The Chinese billionaire has unveiled an even more ambitious plan to expand the company's reach across the globe, creating 100 million new jobs and transforming the global economy to create a more equitable world.
    It may sound pie-in-the-sky, but the goal forms part of mission statement of the US$261 billion company's visionary executive chairman.
    In a letter to shareholders, Ma outlined Alibaba's achievements of the past financial year - including a gross merchandise turnover of more than $195 billion (1 trillion RMB), an "unprecedented" figure - before looking to the future.
    "We have more than 430 million annual active buyers, which means one out of every three individuals in China has made a purchase on our retail marketplaces," Ma wrote.
    But, he said, while proud of Alibaba's online shopping achievements, "we want to do far more", saying that the benefits of globalisation had not been spread evenly, but that "digital disruption will bring us closer to a level playing field for young people and small businesses".
    "We are not merely trying to shift buy/sell transactions from offline to online, nor are we changing conventional digital marketing models to squeeze out a little additional profit," he wrote.
    "We are working to create the fundamental digital and physical infrastructure for the future of commerce, which includes marketplaces, payments, logistics, cloud computing, big data and a host of other fields."
    The Alibaba group of companies, founded in 1999, accounts for 60 per cent of all Chinese online sales, and this year overtook Walmart as the world's largest retailer.

    It has made Ma the second richest man in Asia, with a net worth of US$28.5 billion.
    THE NEW 'NATURAL RESOURCE'
    It's through cloud computing that Alibaba aims to expand its reach, and the company has been investing in the technology as part of a strategy that sees shoppers' data as the contemporary equivalent of mineral riches.
    "Over the next 30 years, with computing power as the new 'technology breakthrough' and data as the new 'natural resource,' the landscape of retail, financial services, manufacturing and entertainment will be transformed," Ma wrote, forecasting a decades-long period of transformation.
    "The internet revolution is a historical inflection point, much like when electricity was introduced, and it may have an even greater impact," he predicted.
    Alibaba's mission, he said, was to "empower merchants with the ability to transform and upgrade their businesses for the future" and "help companies all over the world to grow".
    "We believe, the commerce infrastructure we have created in China - marketplaces, payments, logistics, cloud computing and big data, all working in concert - can be applied on a global scale to lift up small and medium businesses and ordinary consumers around the world."
    Eight years after launching, Alibaba Cloud hosts 35 per cent of Chinese websites, while delivering cloud computing and big data services.
    '100 MILLION NEW JOBS'
    Ma said Alibaba was constantly adapting to the changing e-commerce environment, as staying at the forefront of innovation was key to its continued success.
    "In the coming years, we anticipate the birth of a re-imagined retail industry driven by the integration of online, offline, logistics and data across a single value chain," he said.
    "With e-commerce itself rapidly becoming a "traditional business," pure e-commerce players will soon face tremendous challenges."
    A shift to mobile revenue was one such change, he said, with mobile climbing from a single-digit percentage to three-years of total revenue from Alibaba's Chinese retail marketplaces, in the space of two years.
    "This is why we are adapting, and it's why we strive to play a major role in the advancement of this new economic environment," Ma said.
    Innovations like Alibaba's Qianniu app, which helps online businesses to improve sales and marketing while enhancing efficiency, were an example of the type of projects the company aimed to focus on.
    "In 20 years, we hope to serve two billion consumers around the world, empower 10 million profitable businesses and create 100 million jobs," Ma said, adding: "This will be an even more difficult journey than the one behind us."
     
     
    LISTEN : Newstalk ZB Political Editor Barry Soper speaks to Andrew Dickens on KPMG Early Edition
    Mr Ma - who's worth around $50 billion - met with John Key in Beijing late yesterday. He made his money through founding the online commerce platform Ali Baba.
    Standing alongside the Prime Minister, he heaped praise on the country, which he says is loved by many Chinese.
    "At least 20 of my colleagues retired from Ali Baba. They're all very young, in their 40s, they all go to New Zealand."
    "I asked what they do apart from the golf and green things and they say it's the people there."
    It wasn't all social, with the Chinese billionaire also talking business.
    Jack Ma told the entrepreneurs luncheon Kiwi businesspeople find it difficult to access the Chinese market.
    Mr Ma said he wants to make that easier with his multi-platform organisation.
    "We have Ali Baba University. We would either have courses in New Zealand or invite the entrepreneurs in New Zealand to stay in China for two weeks for training."
    "The second is that we're going to open an Ali Baba business embassy next year in New Zealand."
    John Key is in China meeting business and political leaders.



    Innovation "Made in China" - The Case of Alibaba and the role of Net-based Small Business

    Innovation is a key driver for economic development and social progress and small business is one of the best ways for people to express their willingness and capability to innovate.  Pervasive business ownership has, therefore, been the foundation in many societies for the continued improvement of people’s economic wellbeing. In the People’ Republic of China, however, private business ownership was prohibited between 1957 and 1978. Productive innovations were extremely restricted and as a consequence, China’s economy was on the verge of collapse by the end of 1978. The Chinese people had suffered a historic setback.
    Alibaba’s growth, driven by unleashing grassroots entrepreneurship, has become an exemplar of China’s innovation in the 21st century.  Started by 18 young people in 1999, Alibaba has grown into a giant global internet platform and has made many invaluable contributions to China’s progress. Highlighting the importance of pervasive small business ownership in unleashing grassroots innovation and improving economic wellbeing, Professor Lowrey will discuss Alibaba’s innovative strategies and explain the economic theory behind its inspiring success.



    Dr. Ying Lowrey is Professor of Economics at Tsinghua University and Deputy Director of the Tsinghua Research Center for Chinese Entrepreneurs, and a member of the Academic Committee for Alibaba Group Research Institute. Her teaching and research interests include economics of innovation and entrepreneurship in the internet and platform economy, the modern microfinance market, business demographics, characteristics of business owners, and the role of free enterprise and competition in the macroeconomy. 
    She received her economics Ph.D. from Duke University, economics MA from Yale University and mathematics BS from Wuhan University. Before joining Tsinghua University in 2012, she served as senior economist at the Office of Advocacy, U.S. Small Business Administration and has taught economics at George Washington University and San Diego State University.




     100millionjobcrisis

    100millionjobcrisis

    Founder of Ali Baba commits his work for Chinese on internet to generate 100 million microentrepren…
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