future 8 billion peoples want to value2020 top alumni group Fazle Abed- search your top WRJ if not found rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk who are top job creating economists by practice - health -refugee sports green hong kong..where are top tour guides around billionaire 1 2 around poverty,,, we the peoples ...
If many people are meeting each other for the first time- including a new class at school - we recommend spending the first 3 minutes: ask people to stand up in groups of three- each person spends 60 seconds on the greatest life changing moment in her life to data and what she did differently because of it. Q&A- 1) why's this smart way spending 3 minutes introducing people? 2) how to action debrief everyone? 3) what other tools exist for innovating simultaneous communications among masses of people? 4) Does our species future generation depend on experiencing such culturally simple and trustworthy ways to spend time communicating? Lets consider 4 firstALUMNI OF WORLDCLASSBRANDS: In 1980 we started a True Media debate at The Economist "Year of Brand" on why human sustainability would depend on intangibles valuation and globalisation designing greatest brand leaders aligned to goals of sustaining generations -evidence had been collected with MIT's first database software of society's needs in 50 nations and thousands of markets
as our 2025 Report (first translated 1984) showed the transition from pure knowledge www to commerce would be crucial- all the dismal errors that had been made with mass media tv might have one last chance of correction-we invite you to check out how well did the world's biggest new market makers eg bezos and ma understand this tipping point - twitter version of 2025 report related ref-download 10 minute audio invitation to make 2020s most loving decade ever from family foundation Norman Macrae- The Economist's Unacknowledged Giant
Breaking news- 2 most valuable higher education searches- 1) what are www youth ambassadors for sdgs? what is AI for valuetrue market purpose?how'd you like to search WRJ blog by value chains eg vc1 money vc2 AI & human tech vc3 health vc4 arts and communities happy stuff including olympics vc5 girls safety vc6 education for livelihoods vc7 food as nutrition security & diversity vc8 infrastructure for win-win trade maps vc9 true media
breaking the last empire : americans need to vote now are they separate and superior speciesn OR are they like the rest of the 8 billion of us? new summer 2019 : drucker ::::60 years ago dad, norman macrae, started the first of 100 conversations on AI (Artificial Intelligence), He had just surveyed how Japan was rising (lifting potentially Asians everywhere out of colonial era poverty) round brilliant engineers (bullet trains, container superports , microelectronics, the most reliable engines in the world) - from tokyo he brought back a pocket calculator- what would schools and the world be like if everyone had one of these?

Within a few years the world was debating if tech helps man reach the moon is there any mission impossible on earth.
5G 2020s (4 3 2) 1 G 1970s
And Gordon Moore of Intel had just written a paper promising that microelectronic engineers would improve tech 100 fold every G decade to 2020s -that's a trillion fold more powerful microchips in 2030 than man raced to the moon with. So who's knowledge should teachers and everyone linkin to now if millennials are to be the first sustainability generations and THE UN 17 sdgs are to be celebrated as possible wherever the next girl is born. We welcome your nominations: here are a few examples back from the future of 2030 followed by an approximate chronological order. If in doubt as to whether we know your favorite WRJC please search this blog and mail us chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk if we have left someone out

Wednesday, December 31, 1997

ayesha abed

Dr Martha (Marty) Chen is a lecturer of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School, an affiliated professor at Harvard Graduate School of Design, and senior advisor of the global research-policy-action network, Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO). Before joining Harvard in 1987, she had two decades of resident field experience in South Asia: in Bangladesh in the 1970s – working with BRAC, and in India in the 1980s, where she served as a field representative for Oxfam America. In both capacities, she worked closely with working women living in poverty in villages and urban settlements to promote their economic empowerment. Her book ‘A Quiet Revolution’ is a product of her effort and experience in Bangladesh. She was closely acquainted with the life and work of the late Ayesha Abed, accompanying her on numerous field visits, and among other things working with craftspeople, especially women to revive local craft, among other things.

This article was first published in the special issue of Shetu which marked the 25th anniversary of BRAC.

 Ayesha Hasan Abed and I joined BRAC on the same day in mid-1975. For the next five years, we shared the same office and many of the same responsibilities: directing BRAC’s fledging research unit, planning BRAC’s women’s programme, editing BRAC’s newsletter, and more. We were known as the executive assistants to BRAC’s executive director, Fazle Hasan Abed. But she has an additional and more fundamental role to play, both at work and at home, as Abed’s wife. To the staff of BRAC, he was Abed Bhai (Abed-brother) and she was, simply, Bhabi (sister-in-law). To her friends and family, she was Bahar.

By whatever name, Bahar was the heart and soul of BRAC until her untimely death in 1981. She provided the emotional glue to a fast-changing and fast-growing organisation: listening to and counselling BRAC staff, listening to and advising Abed, negotiating between BRAC staff and Abed. More importantly, perhaps, she provided a moral depth to BRAC’s deliberations. Whether we were discussing budgets or plans, Bahar would always remind us of the wider principles to which BRAC was committed. She was our resident philosopher.

In those early days, Abed, Bahar, and I would often go to their home for lunch. Our one and only topic over countless lunches was BRAC. During those lunchtime discussions, the seeds of many of BRAC’s future programmes were planted. Abed was the grand strategist, Bahar was the thoughtful tactician. I marvelled at their joint vision for BRAC but would, of course, add my two-paisa’s worth of ideas. I will always treasure those lunchtime planning sessions for the excitement in the air, the deliciousness of the fare, and the graciousness of the surroundings. For Bahar was not only a deep thinker but also an elegant hostess. Like Bahar herself, Bahar’s home was invariably well groomed.

During the five years that Bahar and I worked together, BRAC grew from 30 staff to 300, expanded from one area of operation to three, modified and diversified its programmes, and shifted from a rented headquarters to the first BRAC building (which we thought at the time was enormously grand!). Bahar might be surprised to find that the original BRAC building is now completely dwarfed by another larger BRAC building, that BRAC’s programmes have been further diversified, and that BRAC now works in a dozen or more areas. But, then again, she might not be surprised. After all, she believed deeply in Abed himself.

When Bahar died in 1981, her family, friends, and colleagues established the Ayesha Abed Foundation in her memory to promote the employment and empowerment of rural women in Bangladesh. If she were with us to celebrate the 25th anniversary of BRAC, Bahar would, undoubtedly, take great delight in the activities of the Foundation and of BRAC more generally. But she would also, undoubtedly, have many suggestions as to what else needs to be done. We miss her gracious presence and her wise counsel.

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